Download e-book for iPad: Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in by Shahnaz Khan

By Shahnaz Khan

ISBN-10: 0889614008

ISBN-13: 9780889614000

ISBN-10: 1417584416

ISBN-13: 9781417584413

Shahnaz Khan offers the voices of Muslim girls on how they build and maintain their Islamic id. Khan interviewed fourteen Muslim girls approximately their experience of energy, authenticity and position. Her serious research demanding situations the Western belief of Islam as monolithic and static.

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Additional resources for Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in the Diaspora

Sample text

Shahnaz: So you found it restrictive? Safieh: I found it annoying. Shahnaz: Did you find it much different in the [United] States? Safieh: Oh, yes, I remember when I was in New York, I used to rush home before sunset, and I couldn't understand why I was home when the sun was going down. Even when in New York, I start going out at three o'clock in the morning. I wasn't doing anything. I was sitting in a park and reading a book at three o'clock in the morning. I was in a park in a school campus, in front of the security guard's booth.

Moreover, there is little understanding of how Euro-Americans are implicated in continued creation and perpetuation of multicultural differentiation as yet another form of hierarchy. Although cultural differentiation is officially recognized, Lance Roberts and Rodney Clifton (1992) point out that the Canadian state does not favor and fund a multiculturalism that would allow ethnic groups to institutionally consolidate their ethnic identity as separate from other Canadians. Instead, Roberts and Clifton argue, the state promotes a noninstitutionalized symbolic multiculturalism, which allows the flexibility of having both ethnic group membership without the commitment necessary for institutionalized multiculturalism.

Shahnaz: So you found it restrictive? Safieh: I found it annoying. Shahnaz: Did you find it much different in the [United] States? Safieh: Oh, yes, I remember when I was in New York, I used to rush home before sunset, and I couldn't understand why I was home when the sun was going down. Even when in New York, I start going out at three o'clock in the morning. I wasn't doing anything. I was sitting in a park and reading a book at three o'clock in the morning. I was in a park in a school campus, in front of the security guard's booth.

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Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in the Diaspora by Shahnaz Khan


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